Ginger Cake with a Maple Glaze

What makes this Ginger Cake with a Maple Glaze so fabulous is the fresh and candied ginger in the cake! The maple glaze is a great addition to the flavors, lathered and drizzled on top of the cake.

What make’s this Ginger Cake with a Maple Glaze so fabulous is the fresh and candied ginger in the cake!

I often use ginger in stir fry dishes, or blended with olive oil and soy sauce as a salad dressing.

Ginger has gained in popularity throughout Italy, although in the Puglia and Basilicata regions it has been popular for awhile. Ginger’s calming effect on nausea in patients undergoing chemotherapy was studied in 2016 in northern Italy’s institute of cancer research, as well as at the NIH.

Try making a ginger tisane to relax before bed or when you have an upset stomach and it works wonders. Simply add a few slices of fresh ginger to a cup of boiling water and let steep.

Of course the favorite use for ginger is in cookies and cakes like this Ginger Cake with a Maple Glaze.

Ginger Cake with a Maple Glaze

Ingredients:
For the cake:
84 grams fresh ginger, peeled and finely minced
28 grams candied ginger, finely chopped
325 grams all purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon, ground
1/2 teaspoon cloves, ground
1 teaspoon black pepper, ground
240 milliliters milk
226 grams butter, at room temperature
226 grams brown sugar
2 large eggs, at room temperature
120 milliliters molasses
For the glaze:
1 cup powdered sugar
¼ cup maple syrup
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
A pinch of salt
Special equipment:
Oven paper

Procedure:
Preheat the oven to 325°F.
Line a 24 centimeter round cake pan with oven paper.
Lightly butter the bottom and sides of the pan.
Line the bottom of the cake pan with oven paper.
If necessary (particularly in winter) warm the butter for about 20 seconds in the microwave to soften.
Finely chop the fresh and candied ginger.
Add the ginger to the milk and heat over a low flame (or in a microwave oven) for a minute or two until hot but not yet simmering. Set aside.
Whisk the dry ingredients together until well combined.
With an electric mixer on high cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
Add each egg, one per time, until fully blended.
Add the molasses until fully blended.
Add the flour and milk mixture, in thirds, beginning with the flour, until fully blended.
Pour the batter into the cake pan and bake 45 minutes until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean.
Cool the cake on a cake rack for ten minutes.
Loosen the cake from the sides of the pan and invert the cake onto a cake platter.
Remove the oven paper from the cake and discard.
For the glaze:
Whisk all the ingredients together until smooth.
Allow the cake to cool 10 to 15 minutes, then spread the glaze on top of the cake.
As the cake will still be warm, the glaze will drizzle down the sides of the cake.

Please note that the below printable recipe can be viewed in metric or U.S. conventional measurements; just click on your preference within the recipe.

Ginger Cake with a Maple Glaze

Course: Dessert
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 8
Calories: 5140 kcal
What makes this Ginger Cake with a Maple Glaze so fabulous is the fresh and candied ginger in the cake! The maple glaze is a great addition to the flavors, lathered and drizzled on top of the cake.
Print

Ingredients

For the cake:

  • 84 grams fresh ginger peeled and finely minced
  • 28 grams candied ginger finely chopped
  • 325 grams all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon cloves ground
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper ground
  • 240 milliliters milk
  • 226 grams butter at room temperature
  • 226 grams brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs at room temperature
  • 120 milliliters molasses

For the glaze:

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • A pinch of salt

Special equipment:

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F.
  2. Line a 24 centimeter round cake pan with oven paper.
  3. Lightly butter the bottom and sides of the pan.
  4. Line the bottom of the cake pan with oven paper.
  5. If necessary (particularly in winter) warm the butter for about 20 seconds in the microwave to soften.
  6. Finely chop the fresh and candied ginger.
  7. Add the ginger to the milk and heat over a low flame (or in a microwave oven) for a minute or two until hot but not yet simmering. Set aside.
  8. Whisk the dry ingredients together until well combined.
  9. With an electric mixer on high cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
  10. Add each egg, one per time, until fully blended.
  11. Add the molasses until fully blended.
  12. Add the flour and milk mixture, in thirds, beginning with the flour, until fully blended.
  13. Pour the batter into the cake pan and bake 45 minutes until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean.
  14. Cool the cake on a cake rack for ten minutes.
  15. Loosen the cake from the sides of the pan and invert the cake onto a cake platter.
  16. Remove the oven paper from the cake and discard.

For the glaze:

  1. Whisk all the ingredients together until smooth.
  2. Allow the cake to cool 10 to 15 minutes, then spread the glaze on top of the cake.
  3. As the cake will still be warm, the glaze will drizzle down the sides of the cake.
Nutrition Facts
Ginger Cake with a Maple Glaze
Amount Per Serving (80 g)
Calories 5140 Calories from Fat 1827
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 203g 312%
Saturated Fat 124g 620%
Cholesterol 837mg 279%
Sodium 4171mg 174%
Potassium 3427mg 98%
Total Carbohydrates 786g 262%
Dietary Fiber 12g 48%
Sugars 510g
Protein 56g 112%
Vitamin A 130.2%
Vitamin C 5.1%
Calcium 97.8%
Iron 136.6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Full disclosure: I make a small commission for purchases made through links on my blog. Prices are identical to those on the Amazon website, but purchasing through my link helps support my work in bringing you great recipes and culinary information!

Ravioli Caprese

Ravioli Caprese have a pillowy, dumpling-like dough filled with mozzarella, caciotta cheese, eggs and fresh marjoram. They’re unlike any other ravioli you’ve ever tried and if ravioli can melt in your mouth, they do!

Ravioli Caprese just made and ready to cook and serve!

Ravioli Caprese are so distinctly different from any other ravioli because of the way the dough is made, along with its unique filling. They were first made on the island of Capri off the coast of Italy near Naples.

The dough is soft and tender and almost the texture of a dumpling. The filling is made with a mixture of egg yolks, caciotta cheese (similar to a Monterey Jack) and buffalo mozzarella. Perhaps the key ingredient in the filling that gives it its aromatic flare is fresh marjoram. I pick it fresh just before I make the ravioli.

picking marjoram for Ravioli caprese

Making ravioli caprese filling in a food processor

Ravioli Caprese are always served with a delicate tomato sauce made from fresh tomatoes, olive oil and just a touch of garlic. When served, the ravioli are sprinkled with freshly grated Parmesan cheese and minced fresh marjoram.

Ravioli Caprese ready to eat

The dough is made from flour, butter and boiling water…no eggs. I always make it by hand on my countertop but you can use a food processor or a mixer. Once the dough is made cover it with a dishtowel and allow to sit. The dough should be made well enough in advance so that there’s time enough to let the dough sit for several hours to cool completely. It’s not absolutely necessary to wait this amount of time but it certainly makes the dough infinitely more workable.

The dough is far too malleable and tender to cut the ravioli using a pasta machine; it must be done by hand. Place the dough on a well floured surface and use an elongated Italian pasta rolling pin to roll out the dough into a large circle.

Rolling out the Ravioli Caprese dough

Mound the filling onto the dough by teaspoonful, leaving enough space in between the filling to seal the individual ravioli.

Putting filling on dough for Ravioli Caprese

Make sure you only cover half of your dough circle with ravioli filling; gently drape the other half of the dough on top of the ravioli.

Putting filling on dough for Ravioli Caprese

Gently press your fingers onto the dough down in between each mound of filling to seal the dough.

Ravioli Caprese making

Use a ravioli cutter to cut out the individual ravioli, then place them on a lightly floured dishtowel.

Cutting out the Ravioli Caprese

Ravioli caprese on dish towel

If you plan to freeze the ravioli for future use place the ravioli on a baking sheet or a pastry sheet, cover and freeze.

Ravioli Caprese

Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

For the pasta:
400 grams flour
50 grams butter, melted
360 milliliters boiling water

For the filling:
300 grams unsalted fresh cheese (preferably caciotta galbanino), finely chopped (similar to a Monterey Jack)
150 grams mozzarella, finely chopped
2 egg yolks
1 whole egg
Fresh marjoram, to taste, minced

For the sauce:
500 grams peeled tomatoes
80 milliliters olive oil
1 garlic clove, minced

To serve the ravioli caprese:
30 grams freshly grated parmesan
3 tablespoons fresh marjoram leaves

Procedure:

For the dough:
In a food processor, mixer or bowl thoroughly mix the flour, butter and water until you have a soft dough.
Cover and set aside to cool.

For the filling:
In a food processor thoroughly blend the cheeses, egg and marjoram.
If you don’t use a food processor finely grate or chop the cheeses and mince the marjoram before mixing the filling ingredients.

For the pasta:
Thinly roll out the pasta into two rectangles or a large circle.
Put a teaspoon of filling along one of the pasta rectangles (or half of the circle), about two inches (5 centimeters) apart.
If necessary, use a pastry brush to moisten the pasta dough around the filling.
Drape the remaining pasta on top and gently seal the pasta dough together around the filling.
Cut the individual ravioli using a ravioli cutter or a knife.
Place the ravioli on a lightly floured dishtowel to rest while you prepare the sauce.
At this point the ravioli can be frozen for future use (If you freeze the ravioli do not thaw them prior to cooking)

For the sauce:

In a heavy weight pan sauté the garlic in the olive oil until it sizzles (for 30 seconds to a minute).
Add the canned or fresh tomatoes, stir and cook covered on low to medium.
If you use fresh tomatoes cook the sauce until the tomatoes are just tender.
Stir the sauce occasionally to make sure it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan.
Use a fork or potato masher to break up the tomatoes.
The sauce is done when some of the oil separates from the sauce and rises to the top (after about 20 minutes).
Add salt to taste.

Cooking and serving the pasta:
Cook the pasta in salted, boiling water for about two to three minutes.
Only use a teardrop strainer to drain the pasta as they’re extremely delicate.
Place the ravioli caprese on a serving dish and delicately fold in the sauce.
Top with additional sauce, freshly grated Parmesan cheese and minced fresh marjoram.

Ravioli Caprese on platter, ready to be served

Please note that the below printable recipe can be viewed in metric or U.S. conventional measurements; just click on your preference within the recipe.

Ravioli Caprese just made and ready to cook and serve!

Ravioli Caprese

Course: Pasta
Cuisine: Italian
Prep Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Calories: 4332 kcal
Ravioli Caprese have a pillowy, dumpling-like dough filled with mozzarella, caciotta cheese, eggs and fresh marjoram. They're unlike any other ravioli you've ever tried and if ravioli can melt in your mouth, they do!
Print

Ingredients

For the pasta:

  • 400 grams flour
  • 50 grams butter melted
  • 360 milliliters boiling water

For the filling:

  • 300 grams unsalted fresh cheese preferably caciotta galbanino, finely chopped. (Can substitute with Monterey Jack)
  • 150 grams mozzarella finely chopped
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 whole egg
  • Fresh marjoram to taste, minced

For the sauce:

  • 500 grams peeled tomatoes
  • 80 milliliters olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove minced

To serve the ravioli caprese:

  • 30 grams freshly grated parmesan
  • 3 tablespoons fresh marjoram leaves

Instructions

For the dough:

  1. In a food processor, mixer or bowl thoroughly mix the flour, butter and water until you have a soft dough.
  2. Cover and set aside to cool.

For the filling:

  1. In a food processor thoroughly blend the cheeses, egg and marjoram.
    Making ravioli caprese filling in a food processor
  2. If you don't use a food processor finely grate or chop the cheeses and mince the marjoram before mixing the filling ingredients.

For the pasta:

  1. Thinly roll out the pasta into two rectangles or a large circle.
  2. Put a teaspoon of filling along one of the pasta rectangles (or half of the circle), about two inches (5 centimeters) apart.
    Putting filling on dough for Ravioli Caprese
  3. If necessary, use a pastry brush to moisten the pasta dough around the filling.
  4. Drape the remaining pasta on top and gently seal the pasta dough together around the filling.
    Putting filling on dough for Ravioli Caprese
  5. Cut the individual ravioli using a ravioli cutter or a knife.
  6. Place the ravioli on a lightly floured dishtowel to rest while you prepare the sauce.
  7. At this point the ravioli can be frozen for future use (If you freeze the ravioli do not thaw them prior to cooking)For the sauce:

For the sauce:

  1. In a heavy weight pan sauté the garlic in the olive oil until it sizzles (for 30 seconds to a minute).
  2. Add the canned or fresh tomatoes, stir and cook covered on low to medium.
  3. If you use fresh tomatoes cook the sauce until the tomatoes are just tender.
  4. Stir the sauce occasionally to make sure it doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan.
  5. Use a fork or potato masher to break up the tomatoes.
  6. The sauce is done when some of the oil separates from the sauce and rises to the top (after about 20 minutes).
  7. Add salt to taste.

Cooking and serving the pasta:

  1. Cook the pasta in salted, boiling water for about two to three minutes.
  2. Only use a teardrop strainer to drain the pasta as they're extremely delicate.
  3. Place the ravioli caprese on a serving dish and delicately fold in the sauce.
  4. Top with additional sauce, freshly grated Parmesan cheese and minced fresh marjoram.
    Ravioli Caprese ready to eat
Nutrition Facts
Ravioli Caprese
Amount Per Serving (100 g)
Calories 4332 Calories from Fat 2295
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 255g 392%
Saturated Fat 79g 395%
Cholesterol 866mg 289%
Sodium 3131mg 130%
Potassium 1619mg 46%
Total Carbohydrates 342g 114%
Dietary Fiber 15g 60%
Sugars 15g
Protein 176g 352%
Vitamin A 77.3%
Vitamin C 57.5%
Calcium 198.8%
Iron 147.5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Full disclosure: I make a small commission for purchases made through links on my blog. Prices are identical to those on the Amazon website, but purchasing through my link helps support my work in bringing you great recipes and culinary information!

 

Stinging Nettle Fettuccine

Stinging Nettle Fettuccine is a gorgeous way to add color to fettuccine!

Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle

Sometimes foraging happens purely by chance. Yesterday was one of those occasions when my husband and I went for a country walk in our neighborhood and came upon a huge amount of stinging nettle growing in a wooded area. Stinging nettle is not something you want to touch with bare hands, as its name implies. Fortunately it was a chilly day and I had gloves on so my hands were protected. No bag on hand, nor scissors, so I was only able to pick the very tender tips of the stinging nettle, just enough to add to our homemade pasta for lunch to give the pasta a beautiful green color. If I’d had foraging in mind I would have brought along scissors, gardening gloves and a large plastic bag for the stinging nettles. I would’ve then been able to collect enough stinging nettle to make a delicious pot of soup.

Stinging nettle

Stinging nettles, or ortica as it’s known in Italy, grow wild all over the Italian countryside in wooded and partially shaded areas. Like most leafy greens stinging nettle is nutritious so it’s a great find to come upon a large amount of it growing in one place.

Make sure you keep gloves on when you wash and trim stinging nettle so that you don’t touch it directly. Cook stinging nettle in a small amount of simmering water, just as you would spinach. As soon as it’s tender and the leaves have wilted, drain the stinging nettle. At this point you can touch it without any risk of stinging your hands because the cooking process removes the stinging property from the leaves.

Be sure to squeeze the liquid out of the stinging nettle before you add it to your pasta dough. Here’s my quick trick for doing this: take an old dishtowel and spread the stinging nettle across the center of the towel lengthwise, then roll up the towel. With one person holding each end of the towel, twist in opposite directions until all the liquid is squeezed out of the stinging nettle. When you unroll the towel you will see that the stinging nettle is now almost bone dry. The next step is to finely minced the stinging nettle before you add it to your pasta.

Stinging Nettle Fettuccine (serves 2 – 3 people)

Ingredients:
30 g stinging nettle leaves, rinsed
Two large eggs
130 g all-purpose flour (or 200 g all-purpose flour if you don’t have semolina flour)
70 g semolina flour

Special Equipment:
Pasta rolling pin
Pasta machine
Dough scraper

Procedure:
Rinse and trim the stinging nettle; only use the leaves and tender tips of the stems.
Simmer the stinging nettle in lightly salted water just until it has fully wilted.
Drain the stinging nettle and squeeze out all the excess liquid until it is almost bone dry.
A quick tip for doing this:
Spread the cooked stinging nettle out across a dishtowel lengthwise.
With one person holding each end of the towel, roll it up in opposite directions, over a sink. Continue twisting until all the liquid is squeezed out of the stinging nettle.
Unroll the towel and place the stinging nettle on a cutting board, then mince until very finely minced.
On a marble or wooden work surface make a mound of the two flours.
Use your fingers to make a well in the flour mixture.
Crack both eggs into the well use a fork to gently whisk the eggs together; gradually incorporate the flour into the eggs.

Making homemde pasta
Add the stinging nettle to the flour and egg mixture and knead the dough for about five minutes until the flour, egg and stinging nettle are fully incorporated and the dough is smooth and elastic.

Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle

Pasta dough with ortica

Cover the dough with a damp towel or a plastic bowl and allow to rest, preferably for half an hour.
Divide the dough into two or three pieces and while you work with one piece keep the remaining dough pieces covered.
Knead one piece of the dough for a minute, flatten it and pass it through the pasta maker on the widest setting.
Fold the piece of dough over twice, turn 45º, and put through the widest setting again.
Continue this process of folding the dough, turning it, and running through the widest setting of the pasta machine until the dough is very smooth and the edges are no longer ragged.
The dough should look like this:

Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle

At this stage pass the dough through the next smallest setting.
Pass the dough through each successive setting once until the dough has reached the desired thickness. For fettuccine I usually stop at the next to last setting.
At this point the dough will be a long sheet of pasta. Cut it into two or three sections before cutting it into fettuccine.
Either cut the fettuccine by hand or use the pasta machine.
Note: You can roll out the dough and cut the fettuccine completely by hand instead of using the pasta machine but you’ll need a very long Italian-style rolling pin and a large counter space area or extra wooden board.
Once you’ve cut each piece of pasta into fettuccine make sure you dust it well with flour. Loop the stinging nettle fettuccine around into a circle and place it on a dishtowel to rest while you finish cutting the remaining fettuccine.

Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle
Cook the stinging nettle fettuccine in boiling, salted water until al dente.
The cooking process will be very quick, about 2 to 3 minutes, because the pasta is fresh and full of moisture.
If you plan to cook the fettuccine at a later time you can also dry it on a pasta drying rack.
Serve the stinging nettle fettuccine with whichever sauce you like; this fettuccine was served with a simple tomato sauce.

Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle

Please note that the below printable recipe can be viewed in metric or U.S. conventional measurements; just click on your preference within the recipe.

Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle

Stinging Nettle Fettuccine

Course: Pasta
Cuisine: Italian
Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 3 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 3 minutes
Calories: 125 kcal

Serves 2-3 people. 


Luscious homemade stinging nettle fettuccine, made green thanks to the addition of foraged stinging nettle from the Roman countryside. Stinging nettle, known as ortica in Italy, also makes a delicious soup!

Print

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Rinse and trim the stinging nettle; only use the leaves and tender tips of the stems.
  2. Simmer the stinging nettle in lightly salted water just until it has fully wilted.
  3. Drain the stinging nettle and squeeze out all the excess liquid until it is almost bone dry.
  4. A quick tip for doing this:
  5. Spread the cooked stinging nettle out across a dishtowel lengthwise.
  6. With one person holding each end of the towel, roll it up in opposite directions, over a sink. Continue twisting until all the liquid is squeezed out of the stinging nettle.
  7. Unroll the towel and place the stinging nettle on a cutting board, then mince until very finely minced.
  8. On a marble or wooden work surface make a mound of the two flours.
  9. Use your fingers to make a well in the flour mixture.
  10. Crack both eggs into the well use a fork to gently whisk the eggs together; gradually incorporate the flour into the eggs.
  11. Add the stinging nettle to the flour and egg mixture and knead the dough for about five minutes until the flour, egg and stinging nettle are fully incorporated and the dough is smooth and elastic.
  12. Cover the dough with a damp towel or a plastic bowl and allow to rest, preferably for half an hour.
  13. Divide the dough into two or three pieces and while you work with one piece keep the remaining dough pieces covered.
  14. Knead one piece of the dough for a minute, flatten it and pass it through the pasta maker on the widest setting.
  15. Fold the piece of dough over twice, turn 45º, and put through the widest setting again.
  16. Continue this process of folding the dough, turning it, and running through the widest setting of the pasta machine until the dough is very smooth and the edges are no longer ragged.
  17. The dough should look like this:
    Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle
  18. At this stage pass the dough through the next smallest setting.
  19. Pass the dough through each successive setting once until the dough has reached the desired thickness. For fettuccine I usually stop at the next to last setting.
  20. At this point the dough will be a long sheet of pasta. Cut it into two or three sections before cutting it into fettuccine.
  21. Either cut the fettuccine by hand or use the pasta machine.
  22. Note: You can roll out the dough and cut the fettuccine completely by hand instead of using the pasta machine but you'll need a very long Italian-style rolling pin and a large counter space area or extra wooden board.
  23. Once you've cut piece of pasta into fettuccine make sure you dust it well with flour. Loop the fettuccine around into a circle and place it on a dishtowel to rest while you finish cutting the remaining fettuccine.
    Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle
  24. Cook the fettuccine in boiling, salted water until al dente.
  25. The cooking process will be very quick, about 2 to 3 minutes, because the pasta is fresh and full of moisture.
  26. If you plan to cook the fettuccine at a later time you can also dry it on a pasta drying rack.
  27. Serve the fettuccine with whichever sauce you like; this fettuccine was served with a simple tomato sauce.
    Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle
Nutrition Facts
Stinging Nettle Fettuccine
Amount Per Serving
Calories 125 Calories from Fat 72
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8g 12%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Cholesterol 327mg 109%
Sodium 124mg 5%
Potassium 121mg 3%
Protein 11g 22%
Vitamin A 9.5%
Calcium 4.9%
Iron 8.6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Full disclosure: I make a small commission for purchases made through links on my blog. Prices are identical to those on the Amazon website, but purchasing through my link helps support my work in bringing you great recipes and culinary information!

Luscious homemade green fettuccine thanks to the addition of some finely minced wild stinging nettle

 

 

 

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